Co-construction of tools to foster inclusive environments for the social participation of adults with disabilities- in the context of gender and sexual diversity

In Quebec, 2SLGBTQIA+  people represent approximately 10% of the population, which would bring this population to  almost 300,000 older adults over the next 40 years. More than half (56%) of older adults  have a disability. 2SLGBTQIA+ older adults with disabilities experienced systemic  discrimination, associated with stigma, and amplified by ageism, which increases their  probability of having disabilities and being restricted in their social participation. The  intersections between gender identity or sexual orientation, disabilities and advanced age  further increase the risk of vulnerability. Due to higher rates of victimization and  discrimination, 2SLGBTQIA+ people are more likely to experience negative physical and  mental health outcomes. For example, almost one third (31%) present symptoms  of depression, as well as high rates of cancer and HIV. Such health problems are  associated with disabilities limit the opportunities of social connections. Studies showing  that 53% of 2SLGBTQ+ older adults report being isolated. Indeed, GRIS Estrie and  public health authorities identify the social isolation of 2SLGBTQ+ older adults as a major  concern and report the gradual withdrawal from social environments of this population. Accordingly, it is essential and urgent to combat isolation and better support social participation, an important modifiable determinant of health and a key dimension of active aging, of  this population.

Higher social participation has been associated with lower mortality risk  and greater life satisfaction. Despite the important negative consequences of this  exclusion, little is known about how to foster their social participation. According to GRIS Estriecreating inclusive and welcoming environments for 2SLGBTQIA+ older adults is essential and  depends on gatekeepers and service providers increasing their awareness of the specific needs  of this population. For GRIS Estrie, it is critical to identify the unmet needs in terms of social  participation for this population, explorer factors that create barriers or facilitate participation  (e.g., community centres or recreational facilities), and develop awareness and education  tools to reduce discrimination within these environments. The overall goal of the present  project is to co-construct tools that promote inclusive environments for the social participation  of 2SLGBTQIA+ older adults with disabilities (physical and mental health conditions) that  respond to their needs for their inclusion in social life and interpersonal relationships as well as  access to leisure, sports, tourism, and cultural activities in their context.

The specific objectives are:

  1. To identify and prioritize the social participation needs of 2SLGBTQIA+ older adults with  disabilities.
  2. To explore factors that create barriers or facilitate participation according to key  resources for social participation.
  3. To co-design awareness raising campaigns to reduce stereotypes and discrimination specifically among gatekeepers of services for the social  participation of 2SLGBTQIA+ older adults. 
Global progress
- Meetings for members team proposition - Diagnosis of GRIS Estrie needs and problem definition. - Preparation of application for the call
- Planning, coordination and scheduling of tasks and team activities. Meeting 1 - Preparation of ethics committee protocol - Presentation of request to the ethics committee
Actions for Objective 1
- Data collection (10 Semi-structured interviews) - Data analysis
Actions for Objectives 1 and 2
• Actions for Objective 2: - Protocol modification Ethics Committee (interview guide and services based on results of Objective 1). - Recruitment of participants - Data collection - Data analysis • Actions for Objective 1: - Protocol modification Ethics Committee [interview guide based on results of Objective 1 (phase 1) and 2]. - Recruitment of participants - Data collection (15 Walking interviews and Photovoice) - Data analysis • Report writing of results Objective 1 and 2
Report writing of results Objective 1 and 2 • Actions for Objective 3
- Design of awareness campaign. - Implementation of awareness-raising mechanisms designed.
Data return to participants and feedback - Evaluation of the impact of the awareness campaign
Partners
    Team members

    Chercheuses principales :
    – Mélanie Levasseur, Professeure titulaire École de réadaptation, Faculté de médecine et des sciences de la santé, Université de Sherbrooke.
    Chercheuse, directrice du Laboratoire de recherche Connect et titulaire de la Chaire de recherche du Canada sur la participation et la connexion sociale des personnes aînées, Centre de recherche sur le vieillissement (CdRV), CIUSSS de l’Estrie-CHUS.
    Chercheuse associée, Institut interdisciplinaire d’innovation technologique (3IT), Centre interdisciplinaire de recherche en réadaptation et intégration sociale (Cirris), Institut universitaire de première ligne en santé et services sociaux (IUPLSSS) & Federal Institute for Population Research (BiB Fellow, Germany)

    – Mélanie Couture, Titulaire de la Chaire de recherche sur la maltraitance envers les personnes aînées.
    Professeure agrégée École de Travail social, Faculté des lettres et sciences humaines. Université de Sherbrooke
    Chercheure régulière, Centre de recherche et d’expertise en gérontologie sociale (CREGÉS)
    Chercheuse et titulaire de la Chaire de recherche du Québec sur la maltraitance envers les personnes aînées, Centre de recherche sur le vieillissement (CdRV), CIUSSS de l’Estrie-CHUS.

    Partenaire principal :
    – Samuell Beaudoin, GRIS Estrie (Groupe régional d’intervention sociale de l’Estrie)

    Personne avec un savoir expérientiel :
    – Chloé Viau
    – Claude Amiot
    – Denis Cormier Piché

    Autres membres de l’équipe et affiliations :
    – Dolores Majón Valpuesta, ps., Ph. D., Co-chercheuse principale Stagiaire postdoctoral, Centre de recherche sur le Vieillissement, Université de Sherbrooke. Chercheuse postdoctoral, Departamento de Psicología Evolutiva y de la Educación, Universidad de Sevilla (Espagne).
    – Catherine Vallée, erg., Ph. D., Co-chercheuse, Professeure titulaire, École des sciences de la réadaptation, Faculté de Médecine, Université de Laval
    – Jennifer Marchbank, pol., Ph. D., Co-chercheuse, Professor, Department Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies. Simon Fraser University
    – Samuel Turcotte, erg., Ph. D., Co-chercheure, Professeur adjoint sous-octroi, École des sciences de la réadaptation, Faculté de médecine, Université Laval. Chercheur-boursier SRAP-IRSC, Centre interdisciplinaire de recherche en réadaptation et intégration sociale (CIRRIS) – CIUSSS de la Capitale-Nationale
    – Louis – Pierre Auger, erg., Ph. D., Co-chercheure. Stagiaire postdoctoral, Institute of Health Sciences Education, McGill University; Centre de recherche interdisciplinaire en réadaptation du Montréal métropolitain (CRIR)
    – José María Mesquida, ts., Ph.D., Collaborateur, Coordinateur de connaissances et de formation, Fundació Enllaç, Professeur collaborateur École de travail social, Universitat de Barcelona
    – Andreea Zbarcea, Collaboratrice, Coordination des programmes pour les personnes aînées LGBTQ+, Interligne
    – Marie Houzeau, Collaboratrice, Directrice, GRIS Montréal
    – Daniel Gosselin, Collaborateur, Coordinateur de programme, Fondation Émergence https://en.fondationemergence.org/a-propos

    Intersectoral collaboration agent
    Scientific sectors
    Innovation stages
    • Émergence
    All projects